The first rain in Summit, the highest peak of Greenland, ever!




Before a few days, we warned before anomalous heatwave, which was forecasted to hit regions of Greenland and Iceland /https://mkweather.com/heatwave-for-iceland-and-greenland-temperature-should-reach-above-25c//.

In Tasiilaq, southeastern Greenland, +23,6°C was measured, what is temperature only 1,7°C below all-time record for the station /https://mkweather.com/tasiilaq-greenland-236c-only-17c-below-all-time-record-and-summer-days-possibility-of-27c-are-coming//.

The forecasted heatwave was expected to hit firstly continental parts of Greenland, then coasts, and gradually extremely warm air was expected to shift above Iceland.

Extremely warm conditions above the region should persist around a week, yet, and already now, interesting record was measured in Summit, Greenland, 3216 MASL.

A station, where summer temperatures are moving between -39,2°C and +2,2°C and in winter between -63,3°C and -11,0°C recorded its first rain in all-time history!

Reach conditions for rain are for the mountains in Greenland very rare – all-time temperature records tightly above 0°C were measured near summer sunny weather outbreaks, cloudiness and precipitation mean in summer colder daily temperatures, such as during sunshine.

Between Greenland and Nunavut, northern Canada, created in the last days impressive pressure and temperature gradient and while in parts of West-Central Canada and Rocky Mountains in the USA is snowing, Greenland still expect the possibility of summer days (above +25°C) in coastal areas.

Mkweather will monitor the situation and in the case of the next temperature records, we will inform you on our homepage.

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Author: marekkucera
Writer about weather since 2007. The goal of this project is to inform a wide audience about extremes of weather, atmospheric circulation, and climate change around the world. If you like our work, you can support us on Patreon or donate.